fbpx

How A-League clubs can tackle waste management

It’s been widely publicised about how waste is going into landfill as we look at ways to protect our environment.

As a community, soccer clubs around the country have the ability to start making changes that will help the environment become better. What can we learn from overseas?

When you think about it, we go through a lot of waste at soccer games. Plastic cups, cans, food wrappers, bottles and more. Whether it be at the professional or local level, clubs are always dealt the task of cleaning up after matches.

Despite the recycling crisis remaining a problem across Australia, there hasn’t ever really been a system in place about ways to manage the rubbish from matches. Some clubs opt for both recycling and rubbish bins, but sometimes there are only the main general waste bins available.

We can only hope that the recycling crisis eases soon, but what can clubs and ground staff do now to prepare for a more sustainable future?

It needs to be put on the table because recently in Victoria there’s been a speculative idea to solve the current recycling issues – that is to have up to six different bins to seperate kerbside waste.

That’s a lot of sorting out to do if it comes to fruition and if it does happen clubs should start thinking about what measures they can put in place now.

While rubbish sent to landfill is inevitable, are there any lessons to be learned from overseas about how clubs and supporters can help restrict the amount of rubbish?

It comes as a report revealed that over 6 million single use cups for hot drinks were used by fans at Premier League matches throughout the course of the 2018/19 season, demonstrating that it’s not only here that waste could be reduced.

It gives a glimpse into how much waste there is, and why it’s important to address it before it’s too late.

Some changes have already been implemented in English clubs, with some trials being put to the test as they look for creative ways to limit the rubbish sent to landfill.

In a fixture at London Stadium, West Ham trialled a system where they used reusable cups along with 100 well signed collection points, which enabled them to save over 20,000 cups being sent to landfill.

Perhaps even more creative, at Twickenham Stadium they have introduced a deposit return scheme that has been a great success. The refundable deposit comes with a fan’s first drink, and basically they can either return for another drink or leave the ground with a souvenir.

As a starting point, it’s worth investigating how to be more sustainable by relying less on plastics. It comes as single-use plastics are slowly being phased out as a way to limit its damage to the environment.

This is where clubs can begin to become more creative with their resources. Instead of the general plastic that has no use afterwards, people should start thinking twice before chucking something out. Over time if clubs think with this mindset, it would make for some positive changes.

Waste management can be something that can be overlooked by local clubs, but getting fans onside and thinking about how to be more sustainable is a good move forward.

Australian Indigenous Football Championships held in Queensland

The 2019 Australian Indigenous Football Championships (AIFC) were held this past weekend at the Moreton Bay Sports Complex in Queensland.

Players from around the country travelled to compete in the AIFC, with some coming from as far away as Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

This was the second edition of the tournament after last year’s success, giving more Indigenous players the chance to showcase their talent.

A youth competition was introduced this year, where eight teams competed with the Platypus side defeating the Koalas in the youth Grand Final.

In the men’s Grand Final, the Brisbane Warrigals and Maliyans United played out a 1-1 draw in regulation time. The contest would be decided by a penalty shootout, which Brisbane won to claim the men’s AIFC title.

Maliyans United were also involved in the women’s Grand Final, defeating NQ Brolgas 6-0 to win the tournament.

A game between the Indigenous Football community representative team and the QLD Police Service also took place, with the match played in good spirit.

For the first time, all Semi Finals and Grand Finals were livestreamed by SBS with Craig Foster in attendance on Saturday. Foster commentated these matches, as well as meeting with those at the tournament. The games were simultaneously streamed on the NITV Facebook page.

Murray Bird, Football Queensland (FQ) General Manager of Operations, Compliance and Game Development claimed the event was extremely important for football in Australia.

“Football Queensland is extremely proud to be supporting the Australian Indigenous Football Championships in the event’s second year,” Bird said.

“The tournament is a fantastic event for football in our country.

“We look forward to seeing the Australian Indigenous Football Championships continue to grow in the coming years.”

 

Matildas draw record attendance in victory against Chile

Mere days after the huge announcement of equal pay between the Matildas and the Socceroos, the women have set another benchmark.

In their 2-1 win over Chile at the weekend, they drew the highest ever attendance for a women’s international match in Australian history.

20,029 fans flocked to the newly constructed Bankwest Stadium in Sydney to see Sam Kerr strut her stuff, bagging two goals as she lead her side to victory again.

After a disappointing few months following their early elimination from the Women’s World Cup earlier this year, the Matildas are well on their way to re-affirming their position as one of Australia’s strongest internationally represented teams.

The unceremonious sacking of Alen Stajcic also threw a major spanner in the works prior to the World Cup.

But Ante Milicic has done a fine job thus far. Success has seemed to follow the Matildas everywhere since that loss to Norway and this is not limited to on field performance.

The recent announcement of the equal pay agreement clearly is a landmark announcement and will hopefully spur the team on for the foreseeable future.

As we iterated in our article last week, let’s hope we can become the catalyst for a plethora of other countries to follow suit.

But today, the Matildas created another day to remember.

Being their first professional encounter following France, they had the fire in their bellies to do our country proud.

They certainly did that.

They’ve been an inspiration to so many people already, many of whom will hopefully be the next wave of aspiring superstars, both male and female.

With the equal pay agreement and more proof that people genuinely love watching them play at home, nothing seems to be able to stop them now.

And quite frankly, we couldn’t be more excited for what the future holds.

 

 

AusPlay survey reveals most active states and territories

Sport Australia’s latest AusPlay survey has shed some light on how people engage with sport and physical activity across the country, with the Australian Capital Territory posting some impressive results.

It was found that the ACT had the most active adults and during the course of 2018/19, 87.8 per cent of those from Canberra aged 15 or over participated in sport or physical activity at least once a week, which is more than the national rate of 82.3 per cent.

Of the Canberran adults that engaged in physical activity, more than two-thirds of those (69.1 per cent) participated at least three times a week.

Sport Australia CEO Kate Palmer spoke about AusPlay as the survey which is completed by 20,000 Australians each year.

“The latest AusPlay results show that almost 13 million Australians (62.9 per cent) aged 15 or over participate in sport or physical activity at least three times a week. Almost 60 per cent of Australian children are active at least once a week in organised activities outside school,” she said.

“We want to see that increase because we know the physical, mental and social benefits that being active provides.

“Sport Australia’s national Find Your 30 campaign encourages all Australians to get active for at least 30 minutes every day. Of course, the recommended activity levels for children are one hour a day, so that may be 30 minutes at school and 30 minutes at home.

“The Find Your 30 campaign is complemented by a suite of programs that encourages everyone to be active for life, from children to older Australians.

“The Australian Government’s national sport plan, Sport 2030, has set a long term goal for Australia to become the world’s most active and healthy nation. We have accomplished a lot so far, but there is far more to do if we are to continue to get Australia moving and achieve our vision.

“Sport Australia works hand in glove with sporting organisations and physical activity providers across the country to drive participation. No matter what state or territory you live in, there are endless options to be active. The key is finding something that you enjoy.”

On a broader scale, Victoria has the highest proportion of tennis players, New South Wales in swimming, Northern Territory in yoga, South Australia in netball, Western Australia in hockey, Tasmania in recreational walking, Queensland in rugby league and the ACT in football – showcasing the wide variety of sports people love.

AusPlay reveal that recreational walking continues to be the most popular activity across the nation, with almost nine million Australian adults taking part.

For more information about the survey results, you can find it here: https://www.sportaus.gov.au/media_centre/news/australias-most-active-states-and-territories-revealed

© 2019 Soccerscene Industry News. All Rights reserved.

Most Popular Topics

Editor Picks