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Football NSW launches partnership with High Performance specialist Dr Craig Duncan

Soccer Coach Talk

One of Asian football’s leading High-Performance specialists Craig Duncan has begun a new relationship with Football NSW. As a world renowned and respected figure in the areas of both athletic performance and preparation, Duncan will work closely with the governing body in an attempt to provide advice and support for players, coaches and parents alike.

Providing a clear and logical path through often complex, competitive and challenging junior football structures, Duncan’s work is based on a simple clarification and a reminder of why the game is played in the first instance.

Highlighting the often vicarious motivations of parents and coaches, Duncan, a former representative goal-keeper, sees football as an activity initially undertaken for the raw pleasure of kicking a ball and the enjoyment of being in the company of peers. He insightfully reminds all those involved in the game that the sheer joy of football can often be high jacked by over-zealous coaches and the lofty expectations of parents, who perhaps failed to meet their own as players some years earlier.

A lecturer at the Australian Catholic University and after stints working with Sydney FC, the Western Sydney Wanderers and the Socceroos during their successful Asian Cup campaign of 2015, Duncan’s experience and knowledge in both the successful preparation for and playing of the game of football make him one of the most respect Australian voices in Sports Science.

Duncan’s formal partnership with Football NSW will involve a collection of informative videos and recorded seminars posted on the bodies’ official website. The content will cover a range of topics relevant to young players and those involved in junior football.

The basics of physical preparation for football will feature; areas such as hydration, sleep and rest as well as successful strategies to look after a young athletes muscles via effective exercise and stretching practices.

However, it is Duncan’s emphasis on creating an awareness of what an appropriate perspective on the career and performance of a young footballer should look like for a parent and/or coach, is potentially the most important part of his work and message.

Such was the basis of his presentation to an interested and enthusiastic audience at the home of Football NSW at Valentine Park in Sydney’s north-west some weeks back. Dr Duncan’s presentation has now been uploaded and can be viewed at;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYXAg3xC1YE&feature=youtu.be

Based on a lifetime involved in the game, Duncan’s words and the effective visual aids used to simplify and enunciate his message, create a powerful insight into the pressures and expectations often placed on young footballers by the adults surrounding them.

Using alarming and dramatic recreations of abusive coaches, anecdotal tales of parents blinded by a personally driven dream for their child and the harrowing effect such behavior can have on a young player, Duncan is able to convey his message with clarity and effectiveness.

Incorporating personal experiences from his own time as a player and coach when involved in the football journey of his own child adds a weight of validity and value to his presentation that would strike a chord with any parent.

Sadly, his message will not alleviate poor behavior on the sidelines, nor immediately eliminate parents less interested in their children’s success that their own reputation in the game. However, as he correctly points out, raising awareness to such issues and reaching out to others, armed with accurate information and a considered perspective is an important step in reshaping expectations and behavior.

The path through junior football can be a difficult one to tread for parents wishing success for their child. Dr Duncan’s advice on the journey is incredibly valuable in mapping a course that benefits not only the mums and dads on the sidelines, those charged with coaching young athletes, but also the players themselves.

South Australia back 2023 Women’s World Cup dream

The South Australian government have confirmed they will support Australia’s quest to host the 2023 Women’s World Cup.

In the process, South Australia have become the third state, alongside NSW and Queensland, to wholeheartedly get behind Australia’s bid.

The Matildas played in their first match in Adelaide since 2006 last night, defeating Chile 1-0 in front of 10,342 fans.

The crowd figure was the largest ever attendance for a women’s football international in the City of Churches.

Emily Gielnik scored the only goal for the Matildas, with superstar Sam Kerr having her penalty saved just before half time.

If Australia wins the hosting rights to the 2023 tournament, Adelaide will host games at the boutique Hindmarsh Stadium.

South Australian Premier Steven Marshall claimed the State Government was ready and excited about the prospect of bringing the 2023 Women’s World Cup to Australia.

“The FIFA Women’s World Cup is a massive event to add to our sporting calendar, and Adelaide will be a fantastic location for the competition,” said Premier Marshall on Tuesday.

“The Matildas are a shining example of Australian sporting prowess and hosting the World Cup will allow them to showcase their skills on the biggest stage in their own backyard.”

Outgoing FFA CEO David Gallop said he was delighted that South Australia had agreed to support the bid, after initial reluctance.

“The announcement today is a tremendous boost to our hopes of hosting the tournament in 2023. We are thrilled that South Australia have committed to be part of the bid, which will be stronger for their participation.

“It shows just how popular the Matildas are, and I’m sure the South Australian public will be absolutely delighted that Premier Marshall shares our vision and will bring matches to Adelaide should we be successful in our bid,” Gallop added.

Referee initiatives rolled out by Football Queensland

Football Queensland (FQ) has released their 2020-2022 Strategic Plan for football in their state and are set to begin addressing one of their key pillars to achieve over the next few years.

One of the pillars which has been identified is participation, with the aim of increasing referee numbers at the forefront.

FQ has addressed that referees are a highly important part of the game, and as such they want to double the number of registered referees by 2022.

In order to achieve this, FQ will organise some referee initiatives to be carried out in the coming months, including better recruitment, retention and support for referees across Queensland.

The first of these initiatives will be finding a State Referee Manager, which FQ believes will be the start of improved referee programs for the state.

By appointing a State Referee Manager, it will help with the growth of the game which is underpinned by the quality and quantity of referees and coaches who enhance development.

The State Referee Manager will provide a key leadership role for the key areas of referee development, such as recruitment, retention and talent identification of referees.

The appointment of the State Referee Manager will be the start of some exciting growth for football in Queensland, as the Strategic Plan starts to take shape.

Applications for the State Referee Manager position are still open until Friday the 15th November.

To find out more about the role and to apply, you can find it here: https://footballqueensland.com.au/2019/11/09/referee-initiatives-to-be-implemented-following-release-of-strategic-plan/

Australian Indigenous Football Championships held in Queensland

The 2019 Australian Indigenous Football Championships (AIFC) were held this past weekend at the Moreton Bay Sports Complex in Queensland.

Players from around the country travelled to compete in the AIFC, with some coming from as far away as Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

This was the second edition of the tournament after last year’s success, giving more Indigenous players the chance to showcase their talent.

A youth competition was introduced this year, where eight teams competed with the Platypus side defeating the Koalas in the youth Grand Final.

In the men’s Grand Final, the Brisbane Warrigals and Maliyans United played out a 1-1 draw in regulation time. The contest would be decided by a penalty shootout, which Brisbane won to claim the men’s AIFC title.

Maliyans United were also involved in the women’s Grand Final, defeating NQ Brolgas 6-0 to win the tournament.

A game between the Indigenous Football community representative team and the QLD Police Service also took place, with the match played in good spirit.

For the first time, all Semi Finals and Grand Finals were livestreamed by SBS with Craig Foster in attendance on Saturday. Foster commentated these matches, as well as meeting with those at the tournament. The games were simultaneously streamed on the NITV Facebook page.

Murray Bird, Football Queensland (FQ) General Manager of Operations, Compliance and Game Development claimed the event was extremely important for football in Australia.

“Football Queensland is extremely proud to be supporting the Australian Indigenous Football Championships in the event’s second year,” Bird said.

“The tournament is a fantastic event for football in our country.

“We look forward to seeing the Australian Indigenous Football Championships continue to grow in the coming years.”

 

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