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ADI a driving force in LED production

LED screens featuring team banners or advertising have been common in stadiums for several years, becoming a staple for professional teams and leagues.  

New technology has grown in leaps and bounds – over a decade ago we were introduced to live matches in HD and have seen increased coverage overall. 

The idea of featuring LED technology in stadiums is something we’ve become accustomed to, as a new level of interaction and engagement has been achieved for the audiences of clubs and venues. 

ADI has been a provider of stadium screen and digital displays for clubs across the UK, venturing to the fourth tier of English football, League Two. As innovations become bigger and powerful, more professional clubs will be keen to find out what that could mean for them. 

As a company, ADI want to be flexible in what they can offer clubs and organisations. 

“Club’s mindsets are changing. It’s no longer a question of whether they can afford LED technology – it’s about thinking how it can be used to drive revenue,” ADI CEO Geraint Williams said. 

“We’re in an age where fans and brands demand more. Fans want a better experience and brands want better value. 

“Failure to deliver is a huge risk for future growth. There are others in the market who simply install a screen or perimeter LED display and walk away without helping clubs understand how to maximise its value. 

“We’re not that kind of supplier. We very much see ourselves as an extension to a club’s commercial team. Increasingly, we’re working with clubs of all sizes to create new models that increase partner revenue over a long-term basis.” 

ADI offers innovation in stadium hardware and as a content producer, to provide clubs with a valuable revenue generation pathway. 

“Revenue Based Design is a term borrowed from the architecture industry. It’s about engineering something in such a way that maximises the revenue derived from it,” Williams said. 

“In architecture, the theory is applied to buildings and spaces, but the same principle works in designing commercial stadium platforms.  

“Our technical and creative teams work hand in hand to create high impact digital platforms that add value to the matchday experience, whilst maximising the revenue potential of the investment. 

ADI have worked hard over the years to be the frontier of LED technology and a major player for clubs trying to find some extra revenue. They’ve been ever-present for teams in the English football pyramid, including Middlesbrough who currently play in the EFL Championship. 

“ADI completely changed the way we thought about the commercialisation of LED technology,” Middlesbrough Chief Operating Officer Mark Ellis said. 

“We invested in a new perimeter LED system over three years ago. As a Championship club we had to completely rethink the model in order to make it commercially viable. 

“ADI helped us to do that – designing a model that delivered incredible results – a 47% increase in partnership revenue and a 16% profit rise. 

“It’s been so successful we’ve since extended the digital stadium platform with ADI’s help.” 

ADI have not just limited themselves to the UK, but they’ve notably contributed for Germany’s top-flight Bundesliga with virtual advertising hardware.  

A ‘Virtual Hybrid’ can deliver different brand adverts into relevant viewing territories by virtually changing the LED content on screen. This means that clubs and venues have more control over what they want their audiences to engage with. Lagardere Sports, German football’s biggest media rights holder, have deployed this for a few seasons and are able to revolutise the way communications are run on a global scale. 

A move into Germany is just the start of ADI’s ambition. They’ve been servicing customers in offices from five continents overall, including France, South Africa and Ireland, as well as the aforementioned UK and Germany. 

There are ADI franchises in South Africa, Northern Africa and right here in Australia, boasting a vast network across the globe. The ADI brand is still growing, with the company open to adding further partners around the world. 

With COVID-19 posing issues for some clubs and organisations, using LED technology and interacting with audiences has become essential in broadcasts, both for club marketing communications and brand or advertising exposure that affect the success of revenue stream. 

You can find out more about how ADI can benefit your club or venue here. 

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Liam Watson is a Senior Journalist with Soccerscene. He reports widely on international football policy, industry matters and industry 4.0

Deploy Football continues allegiance with Football NSW

Deploy Football have partnered with Football NSW to be the Official Community and Tournament Ball.

Deploy Football have partnered with Football NSW to be the Official Community and Tournament Ball.

Based out of the Sutherland Shire of Sydney, Deploy Football is a proudly Australian owned and leading football developer and manufacturer which services grassroots clubs and schools across the country and internationally.

Deploy’s strong focus on creating high quality products gives players, coaches and organisations the best chance to achieve great results.

A two-year agreement sees Deploy come on board as the official ball for the Waratah Cup, Country Cup, State Cup Finals and Champion of Champion Finals.

“It’s great to be back partnering with Football NSW and helping support grassroots tournaments,” Andrew Head, Founder & Managing Director of Deploy Sports Group Pty Ltd, said.

“We are creating a strong bond with local football clubs & associations and have a clear focus on bringing quality and value to the community – I’m looking forward to a great year of football.”

Football NSW are thrilled that Deploy have recommitted as a reliable locally-based partner.

“It’s fantastic to have Deploy Football on board with Football NSW as our Official Community and Tournament ball for 2021 and 2022,” Football NSW CEO Stuart Hodge said.

“We’ve worked with the brand before, so we know that they will provide a quality product for our competitions, including the Waratah Cup, State Cup, Champion of Champions and our Junior tournaments.”

Football Victoria and Melbourne Chinese Soccer Association begin formal partnership

Football Victoria (FV) has announced a formal partnership with the Melbourne Chinese Soccer Association (MCSA).

Football Victoria (FV) has announced a formal partnership with the Melbourne Chinese Soccer Association (MCSA).

The partnership was created with a mutual alignment of values, including a desire to promote sporting opportunities and social inclusion for men and women from culturally diverse backgrounds.

It builds on the positive relationship between the two organisations, ratified in 2019 with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding.

MSCA and FV share a common goal for football to be used as a platform to promote multiculturalism, gender diversity, an active lifestyle and social inclusion,” FV CEO Kimon Taliadoros said.

This partnership will make the world game more accessible for more people. This is a great result for football in Victoria.”

MCSA was established in 1995 and aims to provide opportunities for young people, predominately but not exclusively for those of Chinese heritage to play football in a friendly, competitive environment.

The association accommodates approximately 1,800 registered players, consisting of more than 70 cultural backgrounds.

As part of this collaboration, MSCA will continue to be the main organiser of the MSCA Winter League, Melbourne U-Nite Men’s Cup and Melbourne U-Nite Women’s Cup.

FV will provide MSCA with priority pitch access for bookings at Darebin International Sports Centre and Knox Regional Football Centre, as well as match balls, meeting spaces and other amenities.

The partnership will provide increased opportunities for people from diverse backgrounds to stay active and socially included.

“MSCA focuses on providing affordable football for the diverse grassroots community of Melbourne,” MSCA President Ben Lau said.

‘’MCSA is excited with the opportunity to work with Football Victoria to ensure that our diverse grassroots community is the winner.’’

Optus Sport to show UEFA Women’s Euros in 2022

Optus Sport have announced they have obtained the rights to broadcast the UEFA Women’s Euro 2022 tournament to Australian viewers.

The competition will feature five of the six top ranked teams in the world, giving Australian fans the opportunity to see what the Matildas will be up against in the build-up to the 2023 Women’s World Cup.

Optus Sport has now acquired the rights to both the men’s and women’s versions of the upcoming European Championships.

Head of TV and Content at Optus Sport, Corin Dimopoulos, said of the announcement: “No matter what the code, every year we are continuing to observe exponential growth in women’s sport across the globe, and we saw this as a terrific opportunity to continue our investment in this market.”

“We had tremendous success streaming the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019, have seen great interest in the Barclays Women’s Super League and are continuing to look into acquiring future women’s football leagues and tournaments,” he said.

UEFA Events Marketing Director, Guy-Laurent Epstein, stated: “We are delighted to welcome Optus Sport as our official broadcaster of the UEFA Women’s Euro 2022 in Australia.

“This deal now means they will transit both the UEFA men’s and women’s European Championships in the next two years, providing unprecedented coverage of both tournaments in Australia,” he concluded.

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