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ChyronHego: Delivering sport performance technology worldwide

ChyronHego is renowned as a worldwide leader for sport performance technology, working with professional teams, leagues, coaches and stadia.

ChyronHego is renowned as a global leader for sport performance technology, working with professional teams, leagues, coaches and stadia worldwide. 

Their massive client list features some of the biggest names in football, including league-wide deals with the Premier League, and the top two divisions of German Bundesliga.  

ChyronHego have proven themselves to be the number one choice as a tracking provider for technological advancement. They’ve been collaborating with both the UEFA Champions League and Europa League, as well as being the preferred supplier for the recent 2018 FIFA World Cup and UEFA European Championships. 

All this major success is largely due to ChyronHego’s award winning solution, TRACAB Optical Tracking. This data capturing offers quality, accurate and reliable data. The essence of this system is to determine the positions of every player on the pitch, along with referees and even the ball. The data will then be outputted live, giving real-time X, Y and Z positional coordinates.  

TRACAB data has been a go-to source for clubs, federations and broadcasters across the world who are looking at ways to access new detailed metrics related to players and teams. The open streamed format of the data is key to making it a real success and offers a more detailed interpretation for finding out what contributes to elite performance in professional football. 

With key information on hand, it allows club sport scientists, conditioning staff and performance analysts to make more informed decisions on the following: 

  • Player recovery protocols and training/match loads. 
  • Benchmark against previous performances. 
  • Benchmark against fellow league performers. 
  • Benchmark against league averages. 
  • Positional awareness evaluation. 
  • Tactical team assessment. 
  • Player pressure values. 
  • Physical metrics in and out of possession. 
  • Interrogate data in ways that suit clients’ needs. 

In 2019, ChyronHego introduced TRACAB Gen5, further enhancing the quality of data collection. Significant improvements were made in tracking quality and accuracy, driven by completely redesigned algorithms, a richer array of camera angles, and powerful new AI features for player, number, and colour recognition. 

“TRACAB has always been the most accurate sports tracking system in the world, but with TRACAB Gen5 we’ve made it exponentially better,” president of sports at ChyronHego, Rickard Öhrn said 

“We’ve overhauled and improved our AI-based image detection tracking algorithms from the ground up to ensure maximum accuracy and the lowest latency. 

“We’re combining these advanced algorithms with multiple high-resolution camera angles, which means we can deliver the highest quality data feed on the market ­— in real-time — and provide an even greater value for leagues, federations and teams, betting companies, broadcasters, and OTT rights holders producing virtual graphics and enhancements for better fan engagement.” 

TRACAB Gen5 has a distributed camera architecture where cameras can be deployed on both sides of the field and behind each goal to capture action from four different angles.  

The flexibility that is offered from the system of multiple camera views allows Gen5 to track every object on the field at a much higher resolution. By stitching and utilising these camera views within TRACAB’s industry-leading computer vision algorithms, Gen5 is able to deliver the highest accuracy of ball and player tracking data in the global sports market.  

The accuracy of player identities is increased through TRACAB Gen5’s AI capabilities, that enables the system to recognise and distinguish player numbers and jersey colours from any angle. Where preferred by clients, this capability also allows for the removal of operators from on-site operations. 

Coach Paint plays a massive part in displaying the data that comes from TRACAB. It supports teams, coaches, pundits, and producers in creating world-class video assets using live, pre and post-game footage. You would see it in sports broadcasts such as Monday Night Football from the UK. 

The use of Coach Paint has revolutionised the way clubs can present video to players. Coach Paint clients have included Premier League’s Chelsea and Arsenal, Serie A’s Juventus and a variety of clubs in England, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Turkey, Israel, Qatar, America, Brazil, Argentina and Thailand, to showcase the worldwide reach.  

Coach Paint is also highly adaptable, having been adopted in Rugby Union, Rugby League, NHL, NFL and MLB. 

The graphics presented by Coach Paint will give insights to coaching staff and managers who can then communicate it with players, whether it be live or pre-recorded. This is essential for any coaches looking to implement game plans and develop a players’ positional awareness.

For professional sport clubs, having access to this information on a regular basis is vital for the training ground or on game day. 

To see more on ChyronHego including their latest news and innovations, you can find it here. 

Liam Watson is a Senior Journalist with Soccerscene. He reports widely on international football policy, industry matters and industry 4.0

CONMEBOL: Biennial World Cup ‘unviable’

CONMEBOL, South America’s continental governing body, has been the latest governing body to condemn FIFA’s calls for a biennial World Cup.

South America’s continental governing body has been the latest to condemn FIFA’s calls for a biennial World Cup.

CONMEBOL, the South America Football Confederation, has backflipped on the issue after initially supporting the idea, claiming it is a “highly unviable” idea.

The statement comes following a technical analysis and consultation with football leaders in South America.

The statement issued by CONMEBOL raised a range of issues with the proposal, including strain on players.

“A World Cup every two years could distort the most important football competition on the planet, lowering its quality and undermining its exclusive character and its current demanding standards,” the statement read.

“The World Cup is an event that attracts the attention and expectations of billions of people because it represents the culmination of a process of elimination that lasts the entire four-year period and has its own dynamics and appeal.

“A World Cup every two years would represent an overload that is practically impossible to manage in the international competition calendar. In the current conditions, it is already complex to harmonise times, schedules, logistics, adequate preparation of equipment and commitments. The situation would be extremely difficult with the proposed change. It could even put the quality of other tournaments, both club and national, at risk.”

Other than the risks to players, CONMEBOL suggested that a biennial event would detract from the occasion.

“The idea of ​​the World Cup is to bring together the most talented footballers, the most outstanding coaches and the most trained referees to determine, in a fair competition, which is the best team on the planet. This cannot be achieved without proper preparation, without teams developing their skills and coaches designing and implementing strategies,” it said.

“All of this translates into time, training sessions, planning, games. CONMEBOL defends the search for excellence in the field of play and is committed to increasingly competitive events of the highest quality. There is no sporting justification for shortening the period between World Cups.

“For the approval of a change of this nature, a broad and participatory process of consultations with all the actors involved is essential. It must be the fruit of a frank debate, in which all opinions and criteria are considered. CONMEBOL is and will always be open to dialogue that seeks the best for football.”

FIFA is seemingly determined to move forward with its plans for a biennial World Cup, despite ongoing opposition.

W-League big winners in new CBA, as greater contract freedom for A-League clubs beckons

A new collective bargaining agreement has been struck between Professional Football Australia and the Australian Professional Leagues.

Equity in high-performance standards in the A-League and W-League, a 32% increase in the W-League salary cap floor and an increase in the A-League salary cap floor are the highlights of the new collective bargaining agreement (CBA) struck between Professional Footballers Australia (PFA) and the Australian Professional Leagues (APL).

The new five-year deal was described as “ground-breaking” by a joint statement between the two bodies, in an announcement that highlights the newfound confidence in the economic environment for professional football in Australia.

Much of that confidence can be linked to the new five-year broadcast agreement with ViacomCBS and Network 10 and it is no surprise that this new CBA has been deliberately linked in length to the broadcast deal.

PFA Co-Chief Executive Kathryn Gill explained that being able to achieve this agreement was a huge milestone for the professional game in Australia, after such a long period of uncertainty in recent years due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the end of the previous broadcasting deal with Fox Sports.

“The players’ vision for the negotiations was economic security and stability for the clubs, the leagues and the players. This agreement is a foundational step towards this objective and our leagues will be stronger as a result,” she said via the joint statement.

“It has been an incredibly challenging time for our game; however, we believe the CBA will provide a platform for our leagues to be re-launched and for a genuine partnership between the clubs and the players to be forged.

“I would like to acknowledge the work of Greg O’Rourke, Danny Townsend, Tracey Scott, Chris Pehlivanis and John Tsatsimas for their efforts and commitment during the negotiations and especially the players who participated so actively throughout.”

PFA President Alex Wilkinson noted the immense sacrifice made by many players to usher the game through the COVID-19 pandemic, which he says helped pave the way for this agreement.

“This generation of players, club owners and staff have been asked to make immense sacrifices to preserve our sport during unprecedented times,” he said.

“As a result of these sacrifices we have been able to take an important step forward and provide greater certainty for the clubs and players and make important progress in areas such as our high-performance environment, player welfare whilst further embedding our commitment to gender equity.”

Under the new CBA, genuine equity in high-performance standards in the A-League and W-League have been entrenched in order to create a “world-class workplace” for all of the country’s footballers.

This CBA will be the first to deliver common standards across higher performance and medical departments across both the W-League and the A-League.

Increases to minimum and maximum player payments are also factored in during the course of the five-year CBA with a particular focus on an increase to the W-League salary floor, providing another massive boost on the back of the recently announced expansion of the competition to also include Central Coast Mariners, Wellington Phoenix and Western United.

There will also be a reformed contracting model that allows for greater capacity in squad investment for clubs, with an allowance for up to two “Designated Player” spots, which will allow clubs to invest between $300,000 and $600,000 in players whose salaries will be excluded from the A-League salary cap.

These “Designated Players” will be in addition to the current exemptions, such as “Marquee Players”.

Furthermore, there will also be greater capacity for clubs to contract youth players with an increase in the cap on scholarship players.

The CBA also provides for guaranteed funding for player welfare and development programs, as well as greater support for the PFA Past Players Program.

APL Managing Director Danny Townsend said the deal was proof that the APL was living up to its promise of greater investment since taking control of Australia’s professional leagues.

“When APL took control of the leagues, we promised it would herald a new era of investment and this agreement shows the progress that has already been made,” he said in a statement.

“This is a clear example of what can be achieved when we work together with a common vision to realise the potential of Australian football.”

APL Leagues Commissioner Greg O’Rourke added the investments would help clubs deliver a much-improved on-field product.

“Players are partners with us in the game and central to its growth. Having all of our partners on-board with the re-imagined future of the game is vital, and this agreement marks an important milestone in our new relationship,” he said.

“There will be immediate improvements across the men’s and women’s leagues, most notably for women’s football, all of which will flow through into improved experiences for players, and ultimately into growing and improving our game.”

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