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Football Queensland maintains its commitment to coaching

Football Queensland are thoroughly investing in creating new opportunities with the continuation of coaching courses around the state.

There has already been over 100 community and advanced courses in 2020, featuring more than 1,500 participants. Despite COVID-19 restrictions delaying these courses for three months, the pandemic has not affected Football Queensland’s Strategic Plan target to reach 8.820 registered coaches by 2023.

On August 2, The Skill Training Certificate held at Mitchelton FC was the 100th coaching-related course or workshop held this year – the 34th since the Queensland Government eased their restrictions on June 1.

Since they hit the century mark, Football Queensland has gone on to deliver another 14 coaching courses and workshops – bringing the total up to 114 as of August 11.

“Strengthening coach development has been a major focus since we released the Strategic Plan and the number of courses on offer are ramping up now that restrictions are easing around the state,” Football Queensland CEO Robert Cavallucci said.

“Through FQ’s statewide Football 2020+ consultations, we recognise that regional areas in particular need coaching resources and support and we’re pleased to have so far conducted 55 courses outside Brisbane in spite of the challenges faced in 2020, with more to be held in coming months.

“That figure encapsulates the 15 MiniRoos, Skill Training and Game Training Certificate courses that have been held in the Football Queensland North zone.

“It also includes the FFA/AFC C Licence course that began in Mackay in February. FQ will drive improvements in the delivery of raw coaching numbers, but we want high standards to be part of that as well. Getting more advanced courses into regional areas makes a huge difference.

“Our Club Development Unit team members are working hard to deliver quality development opportunities and we look forward to creating more education opportunities as the year progresses.”

Football Queensland has already scheduled a variety of coaching courses and workshops, planned to take place in the coming days, weeks and months.

For details about each upcoming course around Queensland and to register, you can find it here.

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Liam Watson is a Senior Journalist with Soccerscene. He reports widely on international football policy, industry matters and industry 4.0

Football Australia recognise Female Football Week achievements

Football Australia are celebrating the achievements and contributions of women and girls in football as part of Female Football Week 2021.

Football Australia are celebrating the achievements and contributions of women and girls in football as part of Female Football Week 2021.

From March 1 to March 8, Football Australia are publishing a variety of digital content highlighting the important role of females in all levels of the sport. In addition, a range of educational factsheets and panels will be shared to assist the growth and development of female coaches, referees, administrators, volunteers and clubs.

Football Australia’s Female Football Week 2021 concludes on International Women’s Day on Monday March 8, following the release of Football Australia’s FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Legacy ‘23 plan at Parliament House in Canberra last week. It aims to deliver immediate and long-term community benefits and economic impact from Australia’s co-hosting of the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 – the biggest sporting event on Australian soil since the Sydney 2000 Olympics.

“Female Football Week 2021 is as important as ever given the stated and sharp focus that Football Australia has on women’s football and the development of women and girls in football,” Football Australia CEO James Johnson said.

“Many of our initiatives throughout the coming week are aligned with key measures in our XI Principles for the future of Australian football and support our efforts to demonstrate to stakeholders the importance of creating a more supportive and inclusive environment for women and girls in football in Australia.

“Football Australia is targeting continued growth and 50:50 gender balance in participation by 2027. We believe Female Football Week provides the game with the platform to accelerate growth and achieve that target by recognising the important role women, together with men, play in delivering women’s football, and by showcasing that football is an inclusive and welcoming sport for women and girls from all communities, ages and abilities.”

Female Football Week 2021 content will be accessible on Football Australia’s digital and social channels.

“Over the next week the Female Football Week campaign aims to provide the community with the platform to celebrate the achievements of players, coaches, administrators and officials,” Sarah Walsh said, Football Australia’s Head of Women’s Football, Women’s World Cup Legacy & Inclusion.

“Excitingly, Female Football Week 2021 will conclude with three online panels to celebrate International Women’s Day and Female Football Week 2021.”

The panels are hosted by Stephanie Brantz, focusing on leadership and development in the modern era. They feature international and domestic executives, coaches and match officials.

The executive panel will feature Sarai Bareman, Chief of Women’s Football at FIFA, Karina LeBlanc, Head of Women’s Football at CONCACAF, Amanda Vandervort, Chief Women’s Football Officer at FIFPRO, and James Johnson and Sarah Walsh from Football Australia.

The coaching panel will feature Emma Hayes, Head Coach of Chelsea FC Women, Tony Gustavsson, Head Coach of the Westfield Matildas, and Mel Andreatta, Assistant Coach of the Westfield Matildas.

And the match officials panel currently features Kari Seitz, FIFA Head of Refereeing – Women, Kate Jacewicz, FIFA & Football Australia Referee, and Esfandiar Baharmast, former FIFA Referee and FIFA Referee Instructor.

“As an organisation that aspires to think local but act global, we’re thrilled that we can produce content with, and access insights from, change agents at the highest levels of football to share with Australia’s passionate football community. This is an important part of our mission for Australia to become the centre of women’s football in the Asia-Pacific region,” Walsh said.

The need for more women coaches – Interview with FCA’s Aish Ravi

New Football Coaches Australia (FCA) Executive Committee member Aish Ravi has made it her mission to inspire more women to take up coaching roles from the community level to the highest level of sport in Australia.

Ravi, who is undertaking a Doctor of Philosophy focusing on women’s coaching education in football, believes Football Coaches Australia is an organisation that can challenge the current status quo amongst the coaching ranks.

“I think FCA has definitely got the potential to make a lot of change in the coaching and leadership space. I’m really excited to help them enact that change,” she said.

“I’m currently doing a PHD looking at women in sport. It’s really about understanding what women’s experiences are in football and why there is a lack of them, and seeing what strategies we can put in place to change that.

“I met Glenn Warry (CEO of FCA) through my involvement of working within the Victorian NPL system and he wanted me to use my knowledge and expertise I guess, in wanting to contribute to give women a voice in FCA.

“We wanted to see how we can amplify their voices, provide more exposure for them and also see how we can increase the number of women coaches.”

A VCE Business Management and Economics teacher by day, Ravi was personally introduced to coaching when she was asked to coach the school’s football side.

After completing an appropriate coaching licence course, she would go on to manage Junior NPL teams at Heidelberg United and Bayside United, before eventually being offered a position to coach the women’s senior team at Bentleigh Cobras.

“We ended up winning the championship in my first season (at Bentleigh) in 2019 which was really exciting,” Ravi said.

“Now we are just trying to regroup and see if we can do the same thing this year.”

Ravi’s passion for coaching is helped by her enthusiasm for working with younger people.

“I really enjoy working with them in a holistic way, so getting to know them and understanding what their interests, motivations and desires are to help them achieve their best,” she said.

“That combined with the love of football, is really why I enjoy coaching football in particular. It’s the world game and once you understand and know that, you can talk to so many people from so many different places. It’s something I get a lot of excitement and enjoyment from.”

FCA Executive Committee member Aish Ravi.

Despite these positive experiences in football, Ravi would still see the coaching game in general dominated heavily by males, something that she believed needed to be addressed.

In response to this, she would go on to co-found the Women’s Coaching Association (WCA) last year with fellow PHD candidate Julia Hay.

“I coach football, but I also play Australian rules and cricket, so I’m quite heavily involved in the community with sport in general,” Ravi said.

“Julia has an Australian Rules background and from talking and sharing our experiences we realised that a lot of the barriers women face coaching football (from my perspective), were actually also similar to that of other sports.

“Sports such as Australian Rules, Cricket, Hockey, Netball all shared common challenges. So, we founded WCA, really to get all the sports together, not just for football.

“We wanted to really bring it together for the coaches, in particular women coaches, but also men who are coaching women.

“We would like to see how we can first of all attract more women and girls to coach sport, how we can develop the women and girls who are currently coaching a team in these sports and also sustain a career.

“They are the three real objectives we have.”

According to Ravi, events like The Women’s World Cup in 2023, the biggest sporting event to be held on our shores since the 2000 Olympics, will hopefully act as a catalyst for necessary social changes in women’s sport. Not only at a coaching or playing capacity, but also at a leadership level.

“It’s a really important event,” she said.

“Sport is the most powerful social institution. It’s great that the Football World Cup is the world’s largest women’s sporting event and it’s awesome that it’s at our home.

“If the Matildas have success that’s great, that can show the young girls and women that they have a pathway, a career, that’s celebrated and respected and perhaps they can succeed in.

“But It’s also vital that we have women leaders that are visible and succeeding, that sends an equally powerful message that there are also career opportunities off the field.”

Sports Flick acquire Austrian Bundesliga TV rights deal

Australian sports streaming service Sports Flick has secured an exclusive TV rights deal to broadcast Austria’s Tipico Bundesliga in Australia.

Australian sports streaming service Sports Flick has secured an exclusive TV rights deal to broadcast Austria’s Tipico Bundesliga in Australia.

The Sydney-based streaming service will start broadcasting the Austrian Bundesliga this weekend – a multi-year agreement allows for one marquee match to be shown per round for the three remaining rounds of the 2020/21 season.

Austrian Bundesliga’s Championship Round and the 2021/22 season are also incorporated in the rights deal, which was brokered with the official global media rights distribution partner for the league, Sportradar.

“Sports Flick has a goal to become the number one location for football in Australia,” Sports Flick General Manager Michael Turner said.

“With football being Australia’s number one grassroots participation sport, fans are craving more football content from across the world. One of our goals is to give fans the chance to watch different competitions and engage with the world’s game.”

Sports Flick said that the Austrian Tipico Bundesliga rights deal was their first major acquisition in European Football.

“Our Austrian Tipico Bundesliga coverage provides Australians a unique opportunity to watch more European Football and watch some of the up-and-coming football stars playing in the Austrian top flight,” Sports Flick CEO Dylan Azzopardi said.

In the coming weeks, Sports Flick are expected to make further announcements regarding rights deals.

Last week, the Sydney Morning Herald reported that Sports Flick had secured the exclusive rights to broadcast the UEFA Champions League in Australia – for around $60 million over three years.

Optus Sport currently holds the rights to the UEFA Champions League on a three-year deal that expires after the 2020/21 season.

The Austrian Bundesliga broadcast deal follows Sports Flick announcement last Thursday, of an exclusive TV rights deal to broadcast South Korea’s K-League 1.

Under a multi-year agreement, the rights deal saw Sports Flick start broadcasting K-League matches from February 27.

The K-League TV rights deal was also brokered with Sportradar.

Alongside the Austrian Bundesliga and K-League, the streaming service also has the rights to the UEFA Women’s Champions League, Liga Primera (Nicaraguan football top division) and the Arabian Gulf League.

 

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