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How LiveStyled enhances the matchday experience

It’s the technology used by more than 50 stadium clients around the world, so what makes LiveStyled such a reliable use of technology?

An award-winning platform, LiveStyled helps to improve the experience of fans attending a game. It has already been used extensively by Tottenham Hotspur, while the Tele2 Arena in Stockholm also caters for home sides Hammarby and Djurgardens IF.

The fundamentals of LiveStyled is to understand more about a fan individually, including where they’re based and what type of membership they have. Through the digital platform, LiveStyled opens up new doors for the fan’s experience from the club.

Everything that LiveStyled does provides more depth to content for the sporting club’s fans. The app features an immersive experience of a stadium and offers a club the chance to deliver unique and exclusive content accessible only on the app. It can be the home for all news, videos and highlights.

For Tottenham, their move to Tottenham Hotspur stadium makes the app even more important. As fans become used to their new home, needs and interests can be tailored for those at the ground and abroad.

For people living in England, they can get travel assistance, easy access at the gate and know exactly where they’re going to sit via an interactive map.

Meanwhile, fans anywhere else in the world can view pre-match news, video, localised sponsors and have a personalised countdown to kick-off.

LiveStyled is available for clubs big and small, with the digital platform offered in ‘Pro’ and ‘Enterprise’ editions for clubs looking for the basic features and functionality or the full package.

More information on LiveStyled can be found here: https://www.livestyled.com/

Liam Watson is the Managing Editor at Soccerscene. He reports widely on football policy, industry matters and technology.

FIFA and EA Sports end 30-year deal

As reported by the New York Times on Wednesday, gaming giant EA Sports and world football governing body FIFA have parted ways.

The partnership dated back to 1993, when FIFA International Soccer was launched for the SEGA Genesis.

Their current partnership was set to expire at the conclusion of the Qatar World Cup, with a new deal aiming to branch out into new areas – including NFTs.

It was reported that EA made a ‘significant offer’ for an eight-year exclusivity deal with FIFA for all of its Esports and gaming rights. However, the deal was knocked back, according to Reuters, as FIFA did not want the rights all with one company.

FIFA 23 will be the last game made in collaboration between the two organisations, set to release in late September this year, worldwide.

The FIFA series was estimated at the start of 2021 to have sold over 325 million units, according to ForbesFIFA 18 is the equal 40th highest selling video game of all time, estimated at 24 million units across all platforms.

FIFA confirmed it would still produce video games with third party developers, while EA will rebrand the FIFA series under the title EA Sports FC. The new series would include licensees such as the Premier League and LaLiga, which at this stage has authentic coverage, as all players are face scanned and the full broadcast packages akin to real life are featured in the game.

SocaLoca: Revolutionising talent identification and tournament organising

SocaLoca co-founders Lionel Foy and Sayf Ismail are providing more opportunity for footballers across the world with their innovative platform.

The concept was born in 2016 when the two first met, and now the SocaLoca app is used by national federations in Belize and Cameroon for tournament organising.

There are two main goals of the platform. Equalising talent identification and becoming a hotspot for football tournaments and data.

Foy and Ismail recognised that the pathways for footballers in some countries weren’t as equal as others. Smaller or less resourced countries and continents simply don’t have the infrastructure that the big footballing powers do globally.

The app operates in a similar way to statistics platforms like FotMob or Transfermarkt, where player profiles and stats are collated for fans and other interested parties to view. However, there is also a self-management aspect to it.

Footballers can download the platform and build their own profile, showcasing their achievements, statistics, results and more for anyone to see. This goes from juniors all the way up to seniors.

This gives those players from lesser resourced regions the opportunity to be seen and scouted like any other player, from when they’re first starting out to battling their way up through the footballing pyramid.

Co-founder Arif Sayuti.

While there are concerns around the data-sharing implicit to the platform, measures have been put in place. Players aged between 7 and 12 must be registered by their guardians and have a limit on what information can be displayed on their public profiles.

The global interconnectedness that an app like SocaLoca offers is unlike anything seen in world football to date.

The other side of the platform is its use in tournament organisation. This links in with the player profiles, where players are registered within tournaments and competitions and have their results and statistics linked to their profiles.

SocaLoca’s Competition Management Module has already seen successful use in Uganda, Belize and Cameroon, and can be used by anyone on the platform.

Football Federation Belize is now using the SocaLoca app to organise and run all regional competitions, while Cameroon’s national football academy is now a partner of SocaLoca.

Results and statistics in countries all over the world are now available to recruiters and talent identifiers, making it easier for those who would be otherwise overlooked to get their chance.

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