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Katholos and Spanoudakis – Players who know best

In this age of uncertainty, Australian football faces great challenges to maintain prosperity in the professional sporting environment.

The decision makers would assure the football fraternity,  the right decisions are being made by the  people who are responsible for the governance of the game.

However, the history of the game is highlighted by the failure to provide former players the opportunity to contribute  in their life after football.

Many of these players have succeeded in the business world but have never been sighted by the hierarchy.

In 1992, the former Socceroo great, Marshall Soper, commented the game was all about administrators, not players.

Two former players who have succeeded in the business world are former Sydney Olympic team-mates, Peter Katholos and Manny Spanoudakis.

Katholos commenced a business in the manufacture and supply of football equipment while still playing professionally, has applied his electronics background in telecommunications and pursued extensive property and development interests.

Spanoudakis’s specialty was in electronic engineering with Unisys and is now General Manager of Sales for global technology company, Cisco Systems, in the Asia Pacific region.

In this interview with Roger Sleeman, Katholos and Spanoudakis provide their insights into Australian football.

 

ROGER SLEEMAN

With the restart of the A- League, what are your views on the current state of the game?

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

Like all fans, I’ve missed the game and it wasn’t before time that the League was recommenced.

Ironically, the pandemic is an inflexion point for the stakeholders to reassess the existing status of the key areas of operational, technical and administrative procedures, and to implement necessary change.

PETER KATHOLOS

The restart was critical because if the League wasn’t to be completed, it could’ve potentially led to its premature demise.

Some players and coaches haven’t returned and without a competition, there was no publicity and the League became a distant memory.

However, the game probably required a reset so it could come out stronger at the other end.

ROGER SLEEMAN

What was your opinion of the playing standard before the halt?

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

Watching overseas football with no crowds over the last few months has given me the opportunity to reflect and compare against the standard of the A League. Whilst the tempo, skill and intensity overseas is more advanced than the A League, turnover of possession and defensive frailties even at the most elite level are still there to be seen. That said, the standard of the A League still has significant scope for improvement in order to be compared with most European leagues.

PETER KATHOLOS

There are a couple of good teams in the League but it’s far from exciting as there is an absence of creative players.

I watched Leeds United v Stoke City a few weeks ago in the English Championship and it was breathtaking.

It highlighted the speed, technique and intensity which is lacking in our game and the bottom line is broadcasters woudn’t be pulling out of A-League coverage ,and subscriptions wouldn’t have been declining so consistently in the last few seasons if the product was better.

ROGER SLEEMAN

What is your view on the XI Principles for the future of Australian football, recently released?

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

The document is voluminous so it’s better to consider the main points.

Point number 1 refers to the requirement for a strong brand and identity. I believe the Socceroos and Matildas already have a strong affinity with even the most casual sports fan across Australia. However, at the domestic level, promotion and marketing of the A League is almost non existant.

The awarding of the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup will certainly increase awareness of our sport across all demographics and we should look to leverage this great event to amplify the A League at every opportunity.

PETER KATHOLOS

To improve the identity of the game, there has to be consistent marketing for the benefit of the sporting public.

People are aware we qualified for the last four World Cups which we should continually market to the masses.

Personally, I was pretty disturbed by the total lack of coverage when the A-League and NPL competitions ceased at the start of the Pandemic.

ROGER SLEEMAN

On that note, what are your thoughts about the viewing audience last Saturday for Central Coast v Perth of 9,000 compared to NRL of 804,000 and AFL 978,000.

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

Before their seasons recommenced, the other codes launched their publicity machines and people knew what was happening.

Honestly,  I wasn’t aware that Sydney FC played Wellington in the first match of A- league until I saw the score the day after.

Also, I didn’t know about the Central Coast match so the message is, there has to be some money spent on promotion because I didn’t see any advertising for the A-League.

PETER KATHOLOS

The figures don’t lie which suggests the A-League isn’t exactly capturing the imagination of the sporting public.

ROGER SLEEMAN

Point 3 of the Principles highlights payments in the transfer system.

Your thoughts about player transfer payments.

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

In order to stimulate the football economy, the most immediate focus should be for the establishment of a transfer system across all levels of football in Australia.

For example, I remember in 1989, Zlatko Arambasic was an up and coming striker playing for Canterbury Marrickville Olympic in the NSW Super League. Blacktown City was in the NSL and paid a $50,000 transfer fee to secure his services.

If NPL clubs can generate revenue from developing players, they can reinvest in better facilities and coaching which sustains the football economy.

PETER KATHOLOS

We need a vibrant and sustainable development system so the NPL clubs can be rewarded via a transfer system which provides the resources for them to continue to churn out quality players for the A- League and the national teams.

ROGER SLEEMAN

Point 5 in the Principles refers to creating a world class environment for youth development.

Your take on this.

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

The whole youth development system needs to be revamped and a funding structure established.

In order to improve the end product, we need a 5-10 year plan which entails developing better youth coaches and investing more in player education.

Parent education also has a key role to play in assisting youth development because up to 80% of the player’s available time during the week is at home.

Consequently, nutrition, fitness levels and private practice of technique and drills have to be of the highest order.

PETER KATHOLOS

Our major objective should be to develop better players who can boost attendances and bring more money into the game with the help of companies and the government.

In the 80’s, when I played at Sydney Olympic, our star local players attracted crowds of 10-15,000 without much promotion.

If you raise standards, more money will naturally flow into the game and also players can be sold overseas providing another substantial revenue stream.

ROGER SLEEMAN

There is a severe absence of past players involved in the game.

How can this change?

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

As a corporate manager, I believe you need football people in the key positions of financial,  operations and marketing.

Historically, the CEO role was awarded to a non-football industry candidate but times have changed and James Johnson’s appointment was a positive one and quite timely.

The previous CEO’S had a lack of emotional connection to the game so at least giant strides have been made here.

PETER KATHOLOS

There are enough football people and former players available to be involved in all areas of the game like in Europe.

When the FFA started, their executives didn’t know who we were.

The skill set of former players should be utilized in coaching, mentoring, marketing and administration.

I applaud the selection of the first eleven but the key issue is, some of these current and former players may have little business experience.

Undoubtedly, there are many former players who have succeeded in business and willing to make a contribution to the progress of the game.

ROGER SLEEMAN

Is the administration hanging its hat on the success of the Women’s World Cup bid?

MANNY SPANOUDAKIS

This is a fantastic victory for the sport as it promotes gender equality and it should be an amazing tournament.

During the difficult times, a better good news story couldn’t have happened to the sport.

PETER KATHOLOS

This was a real success after the failure of the Men’s World Cup bid and hopefully it will encourage a large commitment to building better infrastructure for the sport.

Frankly, I didn’t follow the women’s game closely until the Stajic saga prompted me to take interest.

However, I believe the players like our men, have to improve the technical side of their game if they’re going to be a threat in the tournament.

Sekulovski hits the ground running in Preston Sponsorship Management role

Naum Sekulovski might be in the twilight of his playing career, but he won’t be finishing up with football or his beloved Preston Lions anytime soon.

The former Perth Glory star has taken on the role of Sponsorship Manager for the 2021 season.

Preston has always been a club that has enjoyed enormous support from its community and its playing members.

The chants of “Ma-ke-don-ia” on game day bring goosebumps to all in attendance at BT Connor Reserve.

Even whilst playing at the relative depths of State League 1 for this former National Soccer League heavyweight, Preston has been able to rely on the incredible support of its fans who vote with their feet year in, year out.

However, it is the ability of the club to mobilise the support of the business network within its community that is truly impressive.

In recent years, the Preston Lions committee has enjoyed enormous success in mobilising the support of the business community within its ranks, signing on an extraordinary amount of sponsors a trend that has well and truly continued into 2021.

“At the top end of this year, back end of 2020, [Preston Lions President] Zak [Gruevski] approached me about taking on the role of Sponsorship Manager,” Sekulovski said.

“I’m coming to the twilight of my career as a player, so I’ve always wanted to understand how I can get more involved behind the scenes.

“I’m always going to have that football attachment and I’m interested in the business side of running a football club, so I jumped on board.”

Outside of football, Sekulovski works in pharmaceutical sales, meaning he felt he had a skillset that would allow him to hit the ground running in the role.

A cursory glance at the club’s social media feed over the last few months would demonstrate that Preston’s support goes far beyond boots on terraces and that Sekulovski has certainly gotten off to a fast start.

Since taking on the role, the Preston mainstay said he has been blown away by the business support afforded to the Lions.

“It’s been a really big eye-opener for me and one that I’ve really tried to translate over to the players and the people at a junior level,” he said.

“To be honest, the level of support has been a bit overwhelming.

“At last count, we’ve ticked over 100 sponsors for the year. We’re in a really, privileged position, but we’re here because of the hard work of all the people that have been on the committee over the last few years.”

Preston has kicked off its own “Preston in Business” program of business events for sponsors and is providing corporate hospitality on gameday, which started with a historic night of football at BT Connor Reserve when the club took on Melbourne City in it’s season opening match of the NPL3 Vic season, attracting a bumper crowd on the night.

The club saw another massive turnout last Friday night for their NPL3 Vic clash with Melbourne Victory, showing the Round 1 turnout was no flash in the pan.

“To have that many businesses and invited guests attend our first President’s Club function for 2021, it just made sense to have a program like “Preston In Business” that we could use to help those sponsors engage with and leverage off one another.

“We’ve got so many diverse businesses in our group.”

Following 2019’s State League 1-winning season, not even the loss of the 2020 year could slow Preston down.

“I think success breeds success,” Sekulovski said.

“And it’s not just about the men’s program. We are striving to get to the heights of Victorian football at all levels and we are firmly in the frame of mind that when a national second division presents itself, we want to be a part of that discussion.

“We’re a united front across our men’s, women’s and junior programs and everything is coming together.”

Facilities have also been a major agenda item for the club and redevelopment of BT Connor Reserve, which has been aided by the City of Darebin Council, as well as the generous donation of money and services from the Preston business community has been crucial to the club’s drive forward.

“I think we’re really only just scratching the surface of what’s possible in terms of our partnership with Council and Government,” he said.

“The administration of the club has been working so hard over the last six or seven years and it’s thanks to a passionate group of volunteers which makes the progress we’ve made extraordinary.

“To see that pay off with the night we had against Melbourne City and our new partnership with them, it was incredible.

“I grew up watching Preston. That Friday night I left the sponsorship stand to go and see some of the game with the rank and file and sitting there with so many people in the industrial back streets of Reservoir at our first official night game was something special.”

Preston remains on the lookout for businesses looking to support their charge forward.

Anyone interested in supporting the club or joining as a sponsor/partner should contact Sekulovski or Preston via their Facebook page or club website.

Image Credit: Preston Lions Football Club

Football Australia signs expanded partnership with rebel

Football Australia has announced a multi-year expanded partnership with rebel - Australia's largest sports retailer.

Football Australia has announced a multi-year expanded partnership with rebel, as Australia’s largest sports retailer has signed on to be the official sponsor of Football Australia and the Westfield Matildas through to 2024.

The partnership will support the growth of the women’s game and grassroots football across the nation. The news comes as the Westfield Matildas are currently in Europe preparing for international friendlies against Germany and the Netherlands this month.

The partnership matches the core business of rebel, who want to encourage Australians to live a healthy and active lifestyle doing the sports they love. Football Australia’s mission is to achieve gender parity in participation by 2027.

With Football Australia and rebel sharing similar values, they will focus on initiatives that inspire more females to play sport, as Football Australia aims to secure over 400,000 new female participants over the next six years.

The ‘Sport is Calling’ platform will be used by rebel to motivate women and girls to unlock health and social benefits of pulling on football boots for the first time – this inspires ambitious players to reach their potential by promoting Westfield Matildas’ training regimes.

The partnership links to Football Australia’s MiniRoos program, which will also include a content strategy to bring football fans and rebel customers closer to the action. There will be exclusive, money-can’t-buy opportunities on offer for rebel active members.

rebel General Manager Customer & Marketing, Jennifer Gulliver:

“rebel is passionate about supporting women’s sport and women’s football and to sponsor Australia’s most loved team in the Westfield Matildas is something the whole organisation is behind.”

“We can’t wait to inspire the next generation of girls over coming years, and perhaps help a few realise their dreams of becoming a Westfield Matilda in the future.”

rebel Managing Director, Gary Williams:

“In just two days’ time the Westfield Matildas will return to international action for the first time since March 2020, which will provide inspiration to thousands of girls and boys across Australia’s football family who are preparing to play the game at community and grassroots levels throughout 2021. This unique timing only adds to our excitement to continue our support of football in Australia.”

“With our ‘Sport is Calling’ mantra, rebel is committed to growing sports participation across the country, and this partnership with Football Australia will unlock exciting opportunities and offers for rebel’s football fans through an array of online, in-store, and in-stadia experiences.”

Football Australia Chief Executive Officer, James Johnson:

“We are delighted to have secured another corporate partner for Football Australia that believes in our long-term vision for the sport, including the enormous potential that exists in the women’s and community spaces.”

“rebel has been a long-term partner of football in Australia, and as Australia’s largest sports retailer, is well positioned to help football deliver positive outcomes across the country. As the national governing body, Football Australia looks to work with organisations that will proactively help us supercharge football’s growth.”

Football Queensland upgrades their Club Support Hub

Football Queensland (FQ) has announced an upgrade to their Club Support Hub so that it's more tailored for clubs and volunteers across the state.

Football Queensland (FQ) has announced an upgrade to their Club Support Hub so that it’s more tailored for clubs and volunteers across the state.

The Hub provides a go-to destination for club administrators to access important resources, guides and assistance with club processes and procedures.

“Football Queensland is proud to strengthen our support of the dedicated volunteers in our game by making it even easier for clubs to download resources and guides from FQ’s Club Support Hub,” FQ President Ben Richardson said. 

“A valuable asset for clubs across Queensland, the Club Support Hub is a fantastic example of FQ’s commitment to investing in resources to make the job easier for the volunteers who run our clubs, as outlined in our Strategic Plan.”

Focussing on five key areas, the Club Support Hub is a vital place for up-to-date information on administration, digital & media, coaching, women & girls and the facilities hub. It ensures the future of football is well supported for community participation.

“Launched in January, Football Queensland’s Club Support Hub has proven hugely popular amongst our clubs with over 2,800 views of the webpage, FQ CEO Robert Cavallucci said. 

“Clubs have taken full advantage of FQ’s free graphic design support, with club-specific Play Football graphics created for 30 clubs across all 10 zones in recent months and 160 clubs currently accessing graphic design templates and resources through FQ’s Club Marketing Portal. 

Clubs are also downloading FQ’s Club Marketing Guide, Play Football Retention and Recruitment Guides for advice on retaining membersgrowing their participation base and creating a presence within the local community. 

“Since its initial launch, the Club Support Hub has been upgraded with a new layout focused on five key areas; administration, digital and media, coaching, women and girls, and the Facilities Hub, making it easier to navigate for club volunteers looking for specific resources. 

“A host of new club support guides have also been added to the Hub in recent weeks, including a Club Coach Coordinator Guide and Blue Card Club Guide. A range of new SAP Community Club resources have also been designed to assist clubs in delivering high-quality participation experiences. 

“Football Queensland is proud to be providing this unprecedented level of support to our clubs and volunteers across the state, and we encourage clubs at all levels of the game to visit the Club Support Hub to access the extensive suite of resources on offer.” 

The Club Support Hub can be viewed here.

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