Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2024

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2024

Soccerscene would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year for 2024.

We have now closed for the holiday period and will resume on January 8, 2024.

Now into our fifth year, Soccerscene would like to take the opportunity to thank our major partners Football Coaches Australia (FCA), Professional Footballers Australia (PFA) and Box2Box for their support.

Additionally, we will continuously work with state and national federations such as Football Victoria, Football NSW, Football Queensland and Football Australia to highlight key news for the industry.

There’s been significant strides made within 2023, most notably as the Matildas captured the hearts of Australia in the FIFA Women’s World Cup tournament.

Soccerscene is committed to growing, promoting and enhancing the soccer industry in Australia.

From the entire team, we are excited for what lies ahead in 2024 and look forward to promoting the game further!

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Liam Watson is the Co-Founder & Publisher of Soccerscene. He reports widely on football policy, industry matters and technology.

Football Australia celebrates diversity for Harmony Week

Football Australia have directed the spotlight towards the nation’s diversity, celebrating Australia’s rich plethora of communities throughout the 2024 edition of Harmony Week.

Funded and endorsed by the Australian Sports Commission, the aim of the event is to build a connection with culturally and linguistically diverse newly arrived migrants, ranging between the ages of 5 to 18, through the sport of football.

The week showcased the importance of respect, inclusiveness and sense of belonging amongst everyone.

Victoria were the state in particular whom relished the harmony week on a football front. Three respective diverse communities across Manor Lakes, Croydon and Dandenong were involved in the celebration of diverse culture.

Those Melbournian suburbs include Asian, African and Middle Eastern communities in whom recently arrived to Australia as migrants. Given that football is the primary sport across each of those country’s, members of those experiencing life in Australia for the first time were able to be involved in something which reminds them of home.

Members of those communities had the chance to be involved within football related activities allowing them to showcase their flair and ability.

Those in whom had previously participated within the sport had the opportunity to participate in more advanced activities, while beginners were offered to participate in clinics while being provided information about Miniroos programs.

The events also allowed for new or existing players to seek the possibility of participating at a club level, junior or senior at clubs within close proximity of the suburbs listed.

Dandenong Primary School Teacher, Leanne Skaftouros talked about there being no barrier when playing football.

“There is no barrier, no language barrier. It doesn’t matter if I don’t know your language, you don’t know my language, we can get out and play a game of soccer, which is just amazing,” she said via press release.

Endeavour Youth Australia CEO Mohammad Semra mentioned the importance of community involvement for migrants through the sport of football.

“It gives young people access to club football and also different opportunities to succeed,” he said via press release.

The community event was a collaborative effort, the Wyndham Council alongside Endeavour Youth and migrant information centre were the primary pillars called upon to make the event a success.

FA understand the significance of establishing connections amongst new members of a community, that is the brilliance of Football. The globalisation of the sport allows for these inclusive events to occur. It’s an aspect of Australian culture in which can bring an abundance of people together, all while unifying and inspiring them along the journey.

10-year milestone of Australia Cup achieved with ongoing benefits for semi-professionals

The Australia Cup is the nation’s premier knockout cup competition which has reached its 10th year of existence.

The competition was founded as the Football Federation Australia (FFA) Cup and has been won by five different clubs, with nine unique sides appearing in its respective finals down the years.

Knockout cup football before the reintroduction of it was something which remained an unappreciated element of Australian football with the first attempt of sustaining a competition occurring back in the 1960s with the Australia Cup – the first and only national club knockout competition which was held from 1962 until 1968.

The FFA Cup was ultimately renamed to the Australia Cup in 2022, suiting as a more fitting title for what has become an important piece of silverware within Australian football.

The competition has contributed immensely to the sport in a variety of aspects. Semi-professional clubs across the country have the opportunity to compete against the nation’s best upon their entry in the round of 32, providing spectators with the possibility of witnessing a David and Goliath like matchup. The ‘cupsets’ provide a sense of urgent, frantic football in which fans are jubilant to receive.

Those at the business end of the competition are recipients of prize money, with the winners claiming a cheque worth $131,000. As of 2021, competition winners are placed into continental football play-offs within Asia. Due to the consistent restructure of Asian continental club football, winners of the Australia Cup from 2021 were eligible to qualify for the Asian Champions League via a playoff position, in 2022 the AFC Cup playoffs were up for grabs, with the latter to be changed to the third instalment of Asian football being the newly founded tournament, the AFC Champions League 2.

10 years of cup magic within Australian football has complimented the competitiveness across the sport. The mind races back to all the ‘cupsets’ witnessed throughout the years including the notorious Green Gully victory over the Central Coast Mariners in 2015 where Liam Boland scored from his own half. Not to mention in more recent history, in the cup run Sydney United 58 had gone on.

For lower-ranked clubs across the nation to have the opportunity to compete with professional established clubs has not only provided fans with nostalgic moments, but has opened the another gateway into competing across the continent. The Cup has established itself amongst a trophy of significance in that has also acted as an attraction for international marquee players to venture to Australia from overseas, knowing there’s now three different titles within the sport they can compete for.

The more frequency of football – combined with the magic of the cup – will only serve to open more financial and beneficial opportunities within the sport across the nation.

Based upon its first decade, it’s safe to say its presence has been palpable.

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