Victorian clubs vow to ‘Save Clifton Park’

Clifton Park

On Wednesday August 31, a ‘Save Our Park’ barbeque will be held to raise awareness for what a community’s future holds.

Located in Brunswick, Clifton Park is one of the most used facilities for the locals in the metropolitan Melbourne suburb. Part of the appeal is the current playing surface, which is made up of pure synthetic material and will not suffer major damage from wear and tear.

However, a complication has arisen, with the contrary view from councillors of their plan to rip up the trusty synthetic and replace it – prompting fear from clubs who believe the playing surface is not one that should make way.

The main sticking point is where to spend a budgeted $650,000 in 2023-24. Instead of resurfacing Clifton Park with general maintenance, the money is intended to go towards getting rid of the synthetic and replacing it with natural turf.

Two of the clubs involved in the campaign – Pascoe Vale FC and Brunswick Zebras – are united in the view that eradicating the synthetic is not the solution, and that councillors need to listen to valuable opinions of those at the heart of the facility and know the ins and outs of its value.

It is hoped that the upcoming get together on Wednesday night will be a turning point in what would work towards an ideal outcome, where Pascoe Vale FC Chairman Lou Tona is one of the supporters.

“We’d love it if the entire football community could come down and support the Clifton Park pitch,” he said to Soccerscene.

“It’s an important piece of infrastructure that we want to keep – we’re not asking for another playing surface, it’s just to maintain the one we’ve got.

“We desperately need it because normal grounds cannot cope and leads to cancellations of training, across all codes.

“The synthetic pitch is required and we can’t afford for it to be taken away.”

Part of the argument for the proposed synthetic pitch removal is concerns surrounding the harm that it may cause, related to health and the environment.

This was outlined by Cr Angelica Panopoulos of the Greens:

“By June 2023, Council will develop a report concerning the damaging effects that synthetic materials like fake grass have on human health and the environment, such as urban heat, excess water usage and plastic waste,” Panopoulos said in a statement.

While the statement covers genuine issues, it does not factor in community and sporting needs that Clifton Park best serves.

Essentially, there needs to be a more widespread view on what contributes to health and environment problems, rather than signalling out the synthetic pitch as a problem.

In a statement by Brunswick Zebras – another club backing the campaign – it is all about doing further research on the pros and cons of synthetic before deciding on a knee-jerk reaction.

“Clifton Park synthetic has become a valuable shared facility due to both wet weather and past droughts. This year our club’s ability to cater for the growing demand of natural playing fields has been tested, compounded by the poor maintenance and repair of our three natural turf fields at Balfe, Sumner and Ryder Parks,” they said.

“It has been claimed that the $650,000 for the upgrade could instead be used to demolish the Clifton Park synthetic and replace it with a natural turf. The claim is that this new pitch would have between 40 and 60 hours of carrying capacity – currently our grounds are considered to have a carrying capacity of 20 to 25 hours per week.

“As a Club we would like this claim tested on an upgraded existing football field, not used as an excuse to demolish the synthetic.”

Pascoe Vale and Brunswick Zebras are just two of a multitude of clubs set to come together on Wednesday night.

They encourage anyone who opposes the synthetic pitch removal to head down to Clifton Park for a BBQ from 6pm, with the meeting a sign of solidarity for an important cause.

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Liam Watson is the Co-Founder & Publisher of Soccerscene. He reports widely on football policy, industry matters and technology.

Nike Pacific Brand Director Nick Atkinson: “We have so much equity and history to elevate women’s sport”

Nick Atkinson

Before becoming Brand Director of Nike Pacific – an organisation he’s been part of since 2015 – Nick Atkinson knew very early on that he’d be working in football.

Growing up in Wales of the UK, he was brought up through the school, college and university system that paved the way for his passion to come to life.

From starting off with his first training session at Wick Dynamos in West Sussex, football has been a consistent part of his life.

In this interview with Soccerscene, Nick discusses his role of Brand Director in more detail, Nike’s involvement with the Matildas, working with Sam Kerr and giving back to the grassroots level.

As Brand Director, can you outline your role in helping promote football?

Nick Atkinson: I’ve been involved with Nike since 2015 and even before becoming part of the swoosh family, football has very much been something I am deeply passionate about.

I remember during the final round of my job interview for Nike, I was asked why I wanted to join the team. I didn’t give a great answer, but I had said that I wanted to work on a brand that propelled the game of football and had close ties to the World Cup. And I feel that my love for the game really shined in that moment.

Since taking up the role I’ve been fortunate to be part of so many firsts – seeing how football can uniquely unite and inspire people and nations.

With Nike’s level of global impact, I am aware of the responsibility and part I play in shaping how our athletes are seen, and leading this work on home soil has been a dream.

The Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand for example, was a major project that I led. It was Nike Pacific’s most significant investment in a sporting moment yet – from unmissable out-of-home, a world-first tiktokumentory, football accelerator legacy programs to the first female football-led retail door – the Dream Arena.

I’m immensely proud of what we, as a team, achieved to build a better game for all. It makes all the work we do behind-the-scenes so satisfying when we know it means that the next-gen athletes will have new-found heroes to look up to.

On a local level, after personally playing eight to nine seasons in Victoria’s state and metro leagues, I knew I wanted to get Nike involved as there was so much potential for impact at that level.

Seeing so much success in the sport both at the domestic and international level is a true highlight.

Nike proudly sponsor the Matildas; how do you reflect on FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023?

Nick Atkinson: I’ve worked with both our national teams (Matildas and Socceroos) for many years and have had so many amazing moments – I even remember a free-kick competition with Brett Emerton and Mark Bresciano in 2016 on ANZ Stadium!

If you look at the Socceroos performance in 2022, you can say it’s the ‘greatest assist’ before the 2023 Women’s World Cup because they had set that benchmark for performance and awareness across the country and reignited football.

This year’s tournament has undeniably been a generational moment for sport and culture, having the global tournament on home soil and the home team of the Matildas was the moment to accelerate sport into the future – we know sport creates change, and this was the largest accelerator of women’s sport and culture for the next five years.

The Matildas post tournament are now household names and have shown the world the power of women’s sport. From record-breaking crowds, jersey sales and viewership – the Matildas continue to inspire us all with their captivating performances and genuine love for each other, their fellow athletes and the game.

It felt like it’s been a while coming, but we saw the nation finally galvanise and get behind our national teams – and without a doubt, we’ll look back on the 2020’s as the greatest decade of women’s sport.

Living and breathing football in both my professional and personal life, I can say that we’ve got such a unique Australian football identity. We’re in arguably the most dynamic period that Australian football has ever seen and we’ve opened the sport up to the most diverse audience, which is so exciting and refreshing.

What did you make of user/social media engagement throughout the World Cup – was there anything significant you or your team saw in relation to aspects like shirt sales?

Nick Atkinson: We started working on our plans almost the day after the bid win got announced, so we were 100% ready going into the Women’s World Cup.

We have so much equity and history to elevate women’s sport at Nike, so this wasn’t new for us and has been a journey we’ve been on for a very long time.

When you look at a Matildas match, it is so different compared to the Socceroos. For example, lots of school trips and big groups of young fans, so that is really amazing.

One of the things that we anticipated was going to happen, was the emergence of new voices wrapped around this game. We knew this moment would be successful because it opened opportunities to grow and nurture these new voices in the game. That was one of the rewarding elements, to see different sections of the media and social platforms emerging to give us a new and youthful perspective on the sport.

Our partnership with TikTok saw the creation of 1000 Victories – one of the most successful pieces of media that we worked on through the Women’s World Cup.

This was co-created with a young generation of fans who emerged with a point of view on football and women’s sport. That enriched the game and really took it to new heights, making it bigger and more diverse and gives people a bunch of ways to be involved.

Sam Kerr is hugely popular in Australia and overseas – what was it like building her brand campaign?

Nick Atkinson: It’s been amazing, this is something I’ve personally worked on for a really long time, I’ve enjoyed and am so proud of.

It’s not only Sam but the whole group that we’ve had a relationship with for so long now and that has allowed us to get to know who they are as individuals as well as athletes.

To build a brand plan, you do need to have that full understanding of a person or team to work out how to best approach it.

I placed Sam in her first brand campaign for Nike in 2017 for the launch of the Mercurial Superfly 360 boots. That was at a time where she had just came off winning a Golden Boot in the NWSL and we knew at that point, we had a superstar on the rise.

We featured her in the launch campaign for the boots using billboards and the like, as well as an athlete experience at Rebel. We had an incredible turnout, not only from supporters but across the entire community.

At that time, it was clear that Sam had that star power to take her even further which proved to be the case. Fast Forward and she’s shared a few Mercs with Cristiano Ronaldo and Kylian Mbappe.

I’ve had the privilege to get to know Sam over the many years of collaboration and it has helped us build a strong, authentic platform and brand around her journey.

There’s nothing that we believe in more at Nike than listening to the voice of the athlete and doing work that resonates with them – such as their values and beliefs, and what they stand for. An example of this is something we’ve always told Sam, “We’ll get it right on the pitch first and then build from there.”.

The journey has been amazing and to be part of that is truly special. Our goal is to support Sam and build her brand while she’s delivering ground-breaking performances on the pitch and creating an unbreakable connection with fans.

More broadly, at Nike we believe that it’s not a one-person team with the Matildas by any stretch.

We have an incredible roster of athletes across the Matildas such as Elle Carpenter, Steph Catley, Kyah Simon, Alanna Kennedy, Mackenzie Arnold, Hayley Raso and more, and we’re focused on supporting and elevating the whole roster.

Our brand investment in the Women’s World Cup was the single biggest investment we’ve ever made in this country to elevate the team. We were prepared, we started early and I believe played a critical part in connecting the fans and the team.

Matildas brand stories:

All For Tomorrow

Sam Kerr – Flip The Game

Show the World Your Victory

You are also supporting Fitzroy Lions Soccer Club – what is it like switching back to the grassroots level and giving back?

Nick Atkinson: Football would not happen without volunteers at the grassroots level – it’s an area of the game that we really believe in and want to have a positive impact.

I shared my story coming through the UK, starting out in grassroots football, and being one of those kids that had to hustle for rides from other people’s parents, or ride my bike to games with my brother, and wear my boots until they fell apart, I know what a huge enabler it can be for kids.  Getting involved in Fitzroy Lions has been a real personal love of mine.

We’ve been partnered with Fitzroy Lions Soccer Club since 2018 – they are an incredible organisation where many of the kids come from refugee families and football plays a critical role in uniting that community. It’s where you really feel the power of the world game.

Our relationship started simply, going down to training sessions to meet the team and see what they’re about – they are a rare team in Australia that offers a route into structured league football for kids whose parents can’t quite afford it normally, in a sport that can be quite expensive to play. Through the time spent with them, I really got to know the kids and their families.

It was so enriching and an awesome experience where the club simply provides the opportunity for everyone and eliminates those barriers that people face when looking to play.

So many of us at Nike live and work around those communities so it’s a great opportunity to directly support people related to what we do. We’re proud to be part of something like this and seeing the smiles on the kids’ faces when they’re playing on the field is a real highlight in my career.

Excitingly, like many other grassroots clubs, they have seen a 200% increase in girls participating this season which is so encouraging.

In addition, we’re in the fifth year of naming rights for the Nike FC Cup and recently announced the Nike FC Accelerator Program. This is a four-year commitment with Football Victoria to drive gender equity in the sport by increasing the number of female coaches and giving better access to football at The Home of Matildas.

Overall, we want to provide equal opportunities and this is the legacy that Nike wants to leave in the long run to drive the sport forward.

Indigenous Football Week highlights the impacts of John Moriarty Football

John Moriarty Football

Indigenous Football Week (IFW) 2023 was celebrated October 30 to November 5, recognising the impacts of Indigenous football program John Moriarty Football (JMF).

Putting into consideration that it is Australia’s longest-running and most successful Indigenous Football initiative for 2-18-year-olds, JMF perseveres with its mission to create a beacon of light for social change as well as providing a pathway for Indigenous footballers and communities.

Overseeing JMF is an expert advisory council, Indigenous Football Australia (IFA), which was established to increase social change through football, expand the operations of JMF and ensure equal access to football for grassroots and elite Indigenous players.

Speaking with Soccerscene, JMF Program Director Jamie Morriss and JMF Scholarships Coordinator  & IFA Council member Allira Toby discussed the overall impact of assisting Indigenous peoples and their communities around the country.

What was the process involved in organising the Indigenous Football Australia Council?

Jamie Morriss: We looked at bringing in expertise across a range of different areas, including previous Socceroos and Matildas, and also sport more broadly as well as academia and media. The council has majority Indigenous membership and is gender equal. Its goal is to strategically guide John Moriarty Football. The IFA Council meets once a quarter to discuss where the strategy and direction of the program is going.

Having lots of great experience along with great individuals on that council provides expertise and thinking to help us unlock doors and continue to drive the program forward.

What is the procedure for kids to be involved in the Scholarship?

Allira Toby: A lot is involved in the scholarships. We have a criteria that identifies kids in the communities that have the potential to go far professionally in football. A key component of this is the individual Scholarship Holders, with the support of their family, making a commitment to attend school.

A JMF Scholarship starts at the grassroots level in our community hubs. We provide football training and development, mentoring, help with their studies, providing football equipment and club fees, and even travel to tournaments. As their talent and skills develop, they may then qualify for a Sydney Scholarship during their high school years. In Sydney they will attend a top sports high school, receive extensive football training and development, wrap-around pastoral care, mentoring, tutoring, placement with a football club, and much more.

How many kids have gone far in becoming a professional footballer?

Allira Toby: We have one individual so far playing professional football. Marra woman Shadeene (Shay) Evans is the inaugural JMF Scholarship Holder. She has played for the young Matildas and is currently playing for the Central Coast Mariners in the A-Leagues.

We also have a number of talented Sydney Scholarship Holders who are well on their way to playing professionally and are already playing in high level tournaments and competitions.

What is the vision for JMF?

Jamie Morriss: To grow it across Australia. Ideally we would have a hub operating in each of the states – currently we are in three states, but we would like to offer the program nationwide, with the view of having more staff on the ground to run the grassroots program so we can impact as many kids and communities as possible.

Are there any fees involved for this program?

Jamie Morriss: Not for us – we offer the program free of charge to all the communities that we are delivering to.

We have some contributions from schools and partners that we are delivering to so they help with our fundraising efforts. For the scholarship players that we support in Sydney, we cover their registration fees, boots, shinpads, additional training sessions and we support their travel to and from community so they can go home for the school holidays.

John Moriarty and Shadene Evans in 2018

The sister program of JMF, Indi Kindi, is an innovative early years education initiative for birth to five year olds, delivered by locally employed Aboriginal staff.

The Indi Kindi program includes Indi Footi which activates young brains through movement and develops basic football and motor skills, balance and coordination in a fun and non-competitive environment.

Having been recognised across the A-Leagues, JMF will continue to have an everlasting impact.

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